WHY I advocate?

Finding Answers. Delivering Solutions.
— William Lye
 
 The Supreme Court of Victoria

The Supreme Court of Victoria

What barristers do?

A barrister is a specialist in court-room advocacy, drafting legal pleadings, and giving expert legal opinions. 

Traditionally,  a barrister is retained directly by a solicitor, who represents the client, to advise on the law and evidence, and conduct the trial or appeal in court. Today, in limited circumstances a barrister can be retained directly by a client to provide legal and strategic advice either prior to the commencement of any court proceeding or otherwise in the area of his expertise, 

All barristers in Australia are self-employed and conduct their practice from chambers. They pride themselves in being able to provide a fresh and independent view of the dispute between the parties.

A barrister is likened to a samurai, who is always ready for battle.  The samurai uses his skills in handling and wielding the sword.  He employs "no mind" in executing a defensive or offensive manoeuvre. He serves his lord or master.  The barrister uses his skills in preparing a case, managing the evidence, articulating the legal points, leading the witnesses to tell their story, limiting the opponent's version of the story, and tying everything together so that the judge is able to do justice when delivering a judgment.

What i do?

I am a problem solver in legal, business, and corporate matters.  I have practised as a barrister for 30 years.  The first barrister of Chinese descent practising at the Victorian Bar was William Ah Ket, who died in 1936.  

I believe that every problem has an answer but not every answer is the right solution for the client. I strive hard to find a strategic pathway to resolve a dispute. My Chinese cultural background and understanding of the ancient Art of War teachings enable me to be an effective tactician and advocate. 

I work very well in collaboration with a small team of lawyers including with other Senior Counsel and Junior Counsel. I have also worked with several eminent Senior Counsels, and act as leading counsel in complex cases where I am assisted by other junior counsels.

As I am also admitted to practice in NSW, ACT, QLD, NT, WA, SA, and TAS and have appeared in the Courts in NSW, NT, WA, and SA, I can assist clients in their matters in all jurisdictions. I am also able to assist clients with their international arbitration disputes.

WHAT DOES IT COST?

Litigation is costly. The process takes up much of the litigant's resources in time and money.  Costs charged to clients are often based on a solicitor-client basis, and any amount recovered upon a success outcome is often less than what a client has paid as the Court usually orders costs on a party-party basis.  In some jurisdictions, each party might have to bear its own legal costs. A comprehensive index to the Scales of Costs can be found at the Law Institute of Victoria's website.

Counsel's fess

My hourly and daily rates are within the scale in the Senior Counsel column under the Supreme Court Scale of Costs.  An estimate of my fees will be given prior to the work being undertaken. I usually require my fees to be put into the Trust Account of my clerk in advance of the work being undertaken. Click Trust Account for details.

 Counsel's Scale Fees as at 1 January 2017

Counsel's Scale Fees as at 1 January 2017